"The Standard of Living" - by Dorothy Parker. - …

This issue is touched in Dorothy Parker's "The Standard of Living", ..

Description : Pocket collection of quotations, maxims and poems about motherhood. Authors include William Blake, Les Murray, Dorothy Wordsworh, John Masefield, Dorothy Parker, Princess Grace of Monaco, Sigmund Freud and Abraham Lincoln. Includes folk sayings and proverbs from various countries. The editor has also compiled similar pocket collections of quotations about love and friendship.

Description : The British writer Stevie Smith (1902-1971), perhaps best known for her poetry, also produced novels, short stories, literary reviews, drawings, and performance art. Laura Severin's engaging and extensive study challenges the notions of Smith as an apolitical and eccentric poet, instead portraying her as a well-connected literary insider who used many genres to resist domestic ideology in Britain. This book explores the connections between Smith's work and mass media production; twentieth-century historical events; her romantic and Victorian predecessors; and such contemporaries as Virginia Woolf, Dorothy Parker, Aldous Huxley, and Evelyn Waugh. By presenting Smith in the cultural milieu surrounding World War II, Severin illuminates the still dark period of British women's writing from 1930 to 1960. Focusing on the complete works of Stevie Smith, Severin suggests that Smith's boundary-crossing art forms, which transgress genres and even media, represent an attempt to undo the coherence of femininity as defined in the conservative period of World War II. Tracing her works chronologically, Stevie Smith's Resistant Antics explores the crossing of popular romance and experimental women's fiction in Smith's three novels, the use of contrapuntal technique in her drawings and poetry, the movement from satire to fantasy in her short stories, the combination of performance and poetry in her sung poems, and her work as a popular and literary reviewer. Drawing upon extensive archival research, Severin presents Smith's work as an act of resistance.

In 1914, Dorothy sold her first poem to . At age 22, she took an editorial job at . She continued to write poems for newspapers and magazines, and in 1917 she joined , taking over for P.G. Wodehouse as drama critic. That same year she married a stockbroker, Edwin P. Parker. But the marriage was tempestuous, and the couple divorced in 1928.

"The Standard of Living" - by Dorothy Parker.

The following is a discussion of what the short story "The Standard of Living," by author Dorothy Parker, suggests about the beliefs, dreams, and value systems of today's materialistic society through a satire of the lives of two young American working girls.

This article originally appears in the June 2017 issue of ELLE






The reaction to Littlefield was, predictably, mixed. Scholars and teachers, who saw the allegorical reading (as Littlefield himself had) as a useful "teaching mechanism," tended to be enthusiastic. Many among the faithful, however, were not impressed, including Baum's great-grandson, who curtly dismissed the parable thesis as "insane" (Moyer 1998, 46). Although neither side produced much evidence, Littlefield's interpretation gained widespread currency in academic circles, and by the 1980s it had assumed the proportions of an "urban legend," as history textbooks and scholarly works on Populism paid homage to the allegory.

The contention that is a cleverly crafted political parable reached its apogee in the erudite pages of the . In an article entitled "The 'Wizard of Oz' as a Monetary Allegory" (1990), Hugh Rockoff examined the analogies between Baum's use of imagery and the monetary politics of the Populist era. In the book version of , Dorothy treads the Yellow Brick Road in silver shoes, not in ruby slippers. Silver shoes on a golden road? A key plank in the Populist platform was a demand for "free silver" -- that is, the "free and unlimited coinage of silver and gold" at a fixed ratio of sixteen to one.

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The reaction to Littlefield was, predictably, mixed. Scholars and teachers, who saw the allegorical reading (as Littlefield himself had) as a useful "teaching mechanism," tended to be enthusiastic. Many among the faithful, however, were not impressed, including Baum's great-grandson, who curtly dismissed the parable thesis as "insane" (Moyer 1998, 46). Although neither side produced much evidence, Littlefield's interpretation gained widespread currency in academic circles, and by the 1980s it had assumed the proportions of an "urban legend," as history textbooks and scholarly works on Populism paid homage to the allegory.

The contention that is a cleverly crafted political parable reached its apogee in the erudite pages of the . In an article entitled "The 'Wizard of Oz' as a Monetary Allegory" (1990), Hugh Rockoff examined the analogies between Baum's use of imagery and the monetary politics of the Populist era. In the book version of , Dorothy treads the Yellow Brick Road in silver shoes, not in ruby slippers. Silver shoes on a golden road? A key plank in the Populist platform was a demand for "free silver" -- that is, the "free and unlimited coinage of silver and gold" at a fixed ratio of sixteen to one.

Dorothy Parker (August 22, 1893 – June 7, 1967) was an American poet, short story writer, critic, and , best known for her , wisecracks and eye for 20th-century urban foibles.

What is Dorothy Parker suggesting to readers regarding the values, dreams, and aspirations in today's materialistic society? The story "Standard of Living…

The Purpose of Life Is Not To Be Happy But To …

In October 1908 Clemens attended a birthday party for Dorothy Harvey. One week later on October 30, 1908 Clemens wrote Dorothy Harvey a playful letter congratulating her on being fourteen for one week. Clemens wrote: